Information Requests Monitoring System

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Request ID: 128
Request From: Steve Toth
Date Requested: Jun 20, 2005
Request: The following request for information on ferbam has been received from Kent Smith, USDA's Office of Pest Management Policy. Please check with the experts in your respective states/territories to determine if ferbam is still important for the uses listed below. Note the JULY 1 DEADLINE to respond. Please send your responses via the Southern Region IPM Center Information Requests Monitoring System by June 30, 2005. Thanks. Steve Toth ------------------------------------------ A final decision or RED is expected for ferbam this September. I wrote you last year concerning the unsupported uses, and there was little interest. Now, EPA is evaluating the supported uses and feels there is a need for some risk mitigation. Now is the time to speak up for any critical uses. The questions EPA has are: ********************************************** For the Supported Uses: cranberries, citrus, mangos (24c), nectarines, and peaches 1. What uses are important and why? What is the availability of alternatives. In EPA's words, "What is the market niche for ferbam?" 2. For citrus, is there any usage of ferbam? This appears to apply only to Florida. (Note: You may wish to simply agree with the USDA/NASS fruits data for 2003 on ferbam listed below for your present usage. It shows relatively low usage of ferbam on citrus. Depending on the type of citrus (grapefruit, oranges, tangerines or temples) the percent of area treated is 1 to 4% representing about 45,000 lb ai ferbam. All the usage appears to be in Florida. Do answer the above question for citrus to explain this low usage.) *********************************************** Please send me any responses by July 1. Sincerely, Kent L. Smith, Ph.D. Plant Pathologist Office of Pest Management Policy (OPMP) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 1400 Independence Ave, SW Room 3859, South Ag Building Washington, DC 20250-0315 202-720-3186 (voice) 202-720-3191 (fax) ksmith@ars.usda.gov www.ars.usda.gov/opmp/

Responses
Responder: Michael Weaver
State: VA
Date Requested: Jun 20, 2005
Response: See attached file for ferbam recommendations from Virginia. This lists ferbam for leaf curl control in peaches and nectarines. There are five alternatives listed for leaf curl control. In Virginia Crop Profile for Peaches/Nectarines, ferbam and its alternatives were rated as excellent for control of leaf curl.
Attachment included in response [Download]

Responder: Lockwood David
State: TN
Date Requested: Jun 20, 2005
Response: Ferbam has been an important fungicide for control of peach leaf curl for many years. While there are alternative materials such as Ziram, copper hydroxide and basic copper sulfate, Ferbam has shown to be as effective or even more effective than these alternative materials plus the cost of Ferbam has been relatively low. While peach leaf curl may not be a problem every year, all varieties are susceptible to the disease in various degrees. A severe infection can result in substantial early leaf loss which will compromise fruit growth dramatically. Control is based on a preventive program since, once symptoms are apparent, control is no longer possible. Therefore, most Tennessee peach and nectarine growers use a spray for leaf curl every year during the period from leaf drop in the fall until bud swell in spring. Ferbam has been the primary fungicide used for this purpose.

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: FL
Date Requested: Jun 21, 2005
Response: Ferbam is used in grapefruit, tangerine, lime, and mango production in Florida. This represents about 100,000 acres of production in central and southern Florida. In the citrus commodities, ferbam is used to manage postbloom fruit drop (PFD) and scab. Both of these can be serious economic diseases. The fruit drop is a sporadic opportunistic disease promoted by certain spring weather conditions, while scab is a ubiquitous fungal disease that is usually treated three times a year. Although thiophanate-methyl use in citrus for PFD is currently available under Section 18 exemption and the registrant is working toward section 3 clearance, this status is always in question. Thiophanate-methyl or ferbam would be used for PFD, and again, it would be wise to have a rotational partner for thiophanate-methyl. That being said, PFD has not been observed at substantial levels in several years. Strobilurins and ferbam are effective against scab, and coppers are less so. Therefore, ferbam is the only real rotational partner for strobilurins. A typical yearly program for scab in grapefruit, tangerine, or lime would be ferbam/strobilurin/copper. This is only practiced on about 15 percent of the acreage on a yearly basis, because the cost of material (median price of ferbam is $4.61 per pound of active ingredient and the approximate cost per application is $69 per acre) is fairly high. Therefore, the values presented in the NASS data of 2003 probably reflect less utility than ferbam provides. A survey of lime growers taken in 1999-2000 presents a higher utility - 33 percent of 'Tahiti' lime growers applied ferbam either one (33 percent), three (33 percent), or four (33 percent) times for an average use of 2.6 times per season. Statistical data documented 2,800 pounds of ferbam (33 percent of the acreage treated an average of 2.1 times) used on Florida 'Tahiti' lime trees in 1999. Ferbam is used to manage anthracnose in mango under a special local needs [24(c)] registration. No more than 60.8 pounds of active ingredient may be applied per season. Based on 1999-2000 survey results, 43 percent of mango growers in Florida applied ferbam once (17 percent), twice (32 percent), ten times (17 percent), twelve times (17 percent), or sixteen times (17 percent) per season for an average use of 7.3 times. This was before azoxystrobin was available for use in mango. This material has been used (and perhaps over-used) in mango production for the last three years. As with citrus, ferbam is the only rotational partner for azoxystrobin. One can see by the aggressive use of this material historically that anthracnose is serious economic disease of mango, rendering the fruit unsaleable if left unchecked.

Responder: Bob Bellinger
State: SC
Date Requested: Jun 23, 2005
Response: For SOUTH CAROLINA: Q1. What uses are important and why? Ferbam is a key fungicide for leaf curl control in peach and nectarine. It is a single application in the spring. No other fungicide comes close to Ferbam in regard to efficacy against leaf curl. Without Ferbam effective control is questionable because other materials are either not as effective or have not been tested (especially the newer fungicides like the QoI fungicides have not been tested). (Guido Schabel) Additional comment received from GEORGIA: Ferbam has been an instrumental material for use in peach and nectarine for control of leaf curl. The other products are not as effective. The loss of this material would reduce the ability of producers to control leaf curl. The use is limited to only two applications (leaf fall and prior to bud swell). (Phil Brannan)

Responder: Bob Bellinger
State: SC
Date Requested: Jun 23, 2005
Response: For SOUTH CAROLINA:
Q1. What uses are important and why?
Ferbam is a key fungicide for leaf curl control in peach and nectarine. It is a single application in the spring. No other fungicide comes close to Ferbam in regard to efficacy against leaf curl.

Without Ferbam effective control is questionable because other materials are either not as effective or have not been tested (especially the newer fungicides like the QoI fungicides have not been tested). (Guido Schabel, CU)


Additional comment received from GEORGIA:
Ferbam has been an instrumental material for use in peach and nectarine for control of leaf curl. The other products are not as effective. The loss of this material would reduce the ability of producers to control leaf curl. The use is limited to only two applications (leaf fall and prior to bud swell). (Phil Brannan, UGA)

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: PR
Date Requested: Jun 23, 2005
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response: Puerto Rico contacts have confirmed that this fungicide is not used in that territory.

Responder: David Ritchie
State: NC
Date Requested: Jul 01, 2005
Response: Ferbam has been used on peaches almost exclusively as a dormant spray to control the fungal disease peach leaf curl. There are alternatives such as ziram and copper. Thus, in my opinion, the loss of use of ferbam would have little to no impact on peaches in North Carolina. Dave Ritchie Department of Plant Pathology North Carolina State University

Responder: Charles Luper
State: OK
Date Requested: Jul 01, 2005
Response: For Oklahoma I would say Ferbam is not very important since there is no ferbam products registered in the State Of Oklahoma.

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