Information Requests Monitoring System

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Request ID: 132
Request From: Steve Toth
Date Requested: Jul 05, 2005
Request: Note the following request for information on PCNB in-furrow treatment uses from the USDA's Office of Pest Management Policy. Please circulate to the experts in your respective States/territories and submit any responses to the Southern Region IPM Center Information Requests Monitoring System by JULY 15, 2005. --------------------------- PCNB is nearing a regulatory conclusion. We are in the mitigation phase and EPA has ground water concerns that may result in some cancellations. However, they are very interested in avoiding any severe impact on agriculture. The seed treatment uses of PCNB are unaffected; they will continue. In cases where a seed treatment use and in-furrow treatment are used on the same crop the in-furrow treatment may need to be eliminated to lower risk. The Question: Are there any crops that would be severely impacted by the cancellation of the PCNB in-furrow treatment that have a PCNB seed treatment? If so, why? What does the in-furrow PCNB treatment accomplish that the PCNB seed treatment on that crop does not? Crops affected: peanuts, beans, cotton, and possibly others If this applies to anyone, send me your reply by Friday, July 15. Kent L. Smith, Ph.D. Plant Pathologist Office of Pest Management Policy (OPMP) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 1400 Independence Ave, SW Room 3859, South Ag Building Washington, DC 20250-0315 202-720-3186 (voice) 202-720-3191 (fax) ksmith@ars.usda.gov www.ars.usda.gov/opmp/

Responses
Responder: Mark Mossler
State: FL
Date Requested: Jul 06, 2005
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response:

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: PR
Date Requested: Jul 06, 2005
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response:

Responder: Paul Guillebeau
State: GA
Date Requested: Jul 08, 2005
Response: Here is the response from our cotton/peanut pathologist, Dr. Bob Kemerait. PCNB (Terraclor) is an inexpensive > > option for cotton growers who wish to have added seedling disease > > protection. The percentage of growers who use it is fairly small, > > but it is of importance anyway.

Responder: Charles Luper
State: OK
Date Requested: Jul 14, 2005
Response: Please see Dr. Damicones response on the crops in the attached file. Dr. vonBroembsen informs me that this is not a critical need of our ornamental industry.
Attachment included in response [Download]

Responder: Frank Louws
State: NC
Date Requested: Jul 15, 2005
Response: PCNB is the number one choice for controlling cabbage wirestem. This problem and a wirestem caused by a Fusarium has increased in incidence in recent years. I have also seen PCNB effective on club root in brassicas, particularly when combined with liming the soil pH to above 6.2. We have club root in some home gardens. In conjuction with quarrantine education, these chemicals are useful tools for preventing spread of club root into commercial soils on our cabbage farms. Our local cabbage industry grosses $ 6-9 million annually. There is one commercial cabbage field infected with club root in Washington County, North Carolina. PCNB is also used occasionally on snap beans for Rhizoctonia and Fusarium crown rot control (sore shin), usually as a rescue treatment applied with much water at the base of young plants in the row. Frank Louws Department of Plant Pathology North Carolina State University

Responder: Steve Koenning
State: NC
Date Requested: Jul 15, 2005
Response: PCNB in furrow is the standard for rhizoctonia (sore shin) control in cotton. There are replacements in Quadris and also Rovral. I Expect Headline would also be effective, but is not currently labeled. Steve Koenning Department of Plant Pathology North Carolina State University

Responder: Mac Gibbs
State: NC
Date Requested: Jul 15, 2005
Response: I have 14 snap bean growers in Hyde County, North Carolina that use Ridimil PC on approximately 5000 acres per year. As you know the PC is PCNB. Mac Gibbs Extension Agent, Agriculture North Carolina State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences North Carolina Cooperative Extension, Hyde County Center Post Office Box 219 35 Second Street Swan Quarter, NC 27885 Phone: 252-926-4197 Fax: 252-926-4490 E-mail: Malcolm_Gibbs@ncsu.edu http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/hyde

Responder: Craig Canaday
State: TN
Date Requested: Jul 15, 2005
Response: Some in-furrow pesticide formulations which include PCNB (e.g. Ridomil Gold PC GR or Terraclor 15G) continue to be important to several Tennessee snap bean growers. The "in-furrow" formulations are usually applied in a band as the beans are planted and therefore is not only around the seed but also is mixed with the soil that covers the seed. Rhizoctonia solani is by far the most important disease on snap beans in Tennessee. Since the pathogen attacks the seedling crown as well as the germinating seed, mixing PCNB with the soil above the seed gives a little longer protection than a simple seed treatment. Hence, several Tennessee growers uses these granular formulations whenever disease pressure increases. An important Tennessee frozen food processor also uses Ridomil Gold PC GR regularly on their extensive plantings of snap bean in Indiana and Georgia.

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