Information Requests Monitoring System

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Request ID: 161
Request From: Steve Toth
Date Requested: Aug 09, 2006
Request: Please note the following request for comments regarding the dimethoate IRED. If you or in your state wishes to comment on the dimethoate IRED, please see the instructions below. Also please copy any comments to me and Teung Chin so that I can document them and Teung can follow up with EPA. Note the September 12, 2006 deadline from EPA for comments. Thanks. Steve Toth --------------------------------------------------------------------- On July 12, 2006, the EPA opened the public comment period for its risk mitigation decisions in the "Interim Reregistration Eligibility Decision for Dimethoate". Public comments are due to EPA by September 12. USDA and EPA , in coordination with the registrant, accommodated as many as possible of the received grower and IPM Regional Center feedback received by USDA since early 2006. EPA has conveyed that any outstanding issues, errors or omissions may be addressed during this comment period. Please review the attached relevant excerpts from the IRED and review for appropriate maximum application rate, numbers of applications, days interval between applications, REI and PPE. Please also note any changes in tolerances for your crop/use site. Attached are: (1) Table 6. "Summary of Handler Scenarios with MOEs Less Than 100 When Assessed with Maximum Feasible Mitigation (2) Table 7. Summary of Postapplication Risk Assessment for Dimethoate (3) Table 19. Interim Tolerance Summary for Dimethoate (4) Regulatory Rationale (5) Table 20. Revised Use Site Parameters and Requirements for Dimethoate (6) Labelling Changes Summary Table (See attached file: Dimethoate-IRED-Reregistration-Decisions.pdf) Pleas send comments directly to the EPA docket and a copy to myself. To review all the EPA documents and risk assessments and to file comments, go to www.regulations.gov. Click on "Advanced Search," Click on "Docket Search" then enter " into the "Docket ID" field, "EPA-HQ-OPP-2005-0084" Go to "EPA-HQ-OPP-2005-0084-0034" Click on the golden icon in the "Add Comments" column to enter your comments electronically or to access information on how to mail in your written comments. To read access the entire RED, you may go to "EPA-HQ-OPP-2005-0084-0035" Please note that the registrant did not support for reregistration: kohlrabi, lupine, sainfoin, triticale, cottonwoods grown for pulp, outdoor household domestic dwelling (ornamentals and shrubs), recreational areas, outdoor commercial/institutional/industrial premises, outdoor refuse/solid waste, phragmites reed beds, and sewage treatment systems. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or comments. Best regards, Teung F. Chin, Ph.D. Biological Scientist Office of Pest Management Policy Agricultural Research Service United States Department of Agriculture LOCATED AT: USDA Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service 4700 River Road, Unit 149 (Room 3D-06.8) Riverdale, MD 20737-1237 Phone (301) 734-8943 Fax (301) 734-5992 Teung.F.Chin@usda.gov http://www.ars.usda.gov/opmp

Responses
Responder: Mark Mossler
State: VI
Date Requested: Aug 25, 2006
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response:

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: PR
Date Requested: Aug 25, 2006
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response:

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: FL
Date Requested: Aug 25, 2006
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response: Historical data reflects minor use of dimethoate in FL citrus. This is due to an integrated system that largely utilizes natural predators to control insects. In late 2005, citrus greening was discovered in Florida, where the vector, citrus psyllid has been since the late 90's. With the advent of citrus greening in the state, citrus researchers are examining systemic insecticides which could be soil applied so that the natural enemies of citrus insect pests are not impacted. Dimethoate would be one of these tools, and preliminary research conducted by UF has confirmed the utility of dimethoate in controlling psyllids. It would be arbitarary and capricious to cancel the use of dimethoate on FL citrus based on modeling assumptions. I would recommend the availability of at least one application per year. Mark Mossler Doctor of Plant Medicine UF/IFAS Pest Management Information Program Gainesville, FL 32611 352 392-4721

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: FL
Date Requested: Aug 25, 2006
Response: Historical data reflects minor use of dimethoate in FL citrus. This is due to an integrated system that largely utilizes natural predators to control insects. In late 2005, citrus greening was discovered in Florida, where the vector, citrus psyllid has been since the late 90's. With the advent of citrus greening in the state, citrus researchers are examining systemic insecticides which could be soil applied so that the natural enemies of citrus insect pests are not impacted. Dimethoate would be one of these tools, and preliminary research conducted by UF has confirmed the utility of dimethoate in controlling psyllids. It would be arbitarary and capricious to cancel the use of dimethoate on FL citrus based on modeling assumptions. I would recommend the availability of at least one application per year. Mark Mossler Doctor of Plant Medicine UF/IFAS Pest Management Information Program Gainesville, FL 32611 352 392-4721

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