Information Requests Monitoring System

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Request ID: 181
Request From: Steve Toth
Date Requested: Oct 26, 2007
Request: Please note the following request for information on grower interest for malathion selected crops. Please check with the experts in your respective states and territories and submit any responses to the Southern Region IPM Center Information Monitoring System by Friday, November 2, 2007. Thanks. Steve Toth -------------------------------------------- Dear Colleagues: We are nearing final EPA decisions for the use of malathion. The registrant, Cheminova has requested that USDA again ascertain grower interest in the following crops which have room in the malathion risk cup but are not planned to be currently supported by the registrant. If one of the following commodities need to have the use of malathion retained, please let me know in two weeks. USDA requested your feedback perhaps four or five years ago but because of the changed OP landscape we thought it best to ascertain your pesticide tool needs again. Thanks in advance! Teung almonds cowpea cranberries hazelnuts lentils peanuts peavines plums prunes raisins safflower sugar beets sunflowers Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or comments. Teung F. Chin, Ph.D. Biological Scientist Office of Pest Management Policy Agricultural Research Service United States Department of Agriculture LOCATED AT: USDA Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service 4700 River Road, Unit 149 (Room 3D-06.29) Riverdale, MD 20737-1237 Phone (301) 734-8943 Fax (301) 734-5992 Teung.F.Chin@usda.gov http://www.ars.usda.gov/opmp

Responses
Responder:
State: AR
Date Requested: Oct 26, 2007
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response:

Responder: Paul Guillebeau
State: GA
Date Requested: Oct 26, 2007
Response: We can probably live without it, but malathion and dimethoate are the only general use non-pyrethoid insecticides left on peas. As long as we keep dimethoate I would say we are OK (I suspect not much of either is used, but it is good to have the option). One other issue - we still have malathion on beans, and having beans and not peas causes all kinds of confusion (I still don't know which crops fall in which group). Response provided by Dr. Alton Sparks, Jr., UGA Extension entomologist (asparks@uga.edu )

Responder: Frank Hale
State: TN
Date Requested: Oct 26, 2007
Response: My concern would be the loss of malathion for use on non-commercial (backyard)plum production. Multipurpose Fruit sprays contain a combination of insecticide(s) and fungicide. Several years ago, we lost the use of methoxychlor which was a common component of these multipurpose fruit sprays. The current multipurpose fruit sprays contain a fungicide (captan) plus carbaryl (Sevin)by itself or in combination with malathion. If malathion is lost, Sevin would probably be the only insecticide left in the multipurpose spray. Malathion and Sevin both have a 3 day preharvest interval while an alternative insecticide labeled on plum, esfenvalerate (Ortho BugBGone Multi-Purpose Insect Killer, has a 14 day preharvest interval. Sevin and esfenvalerate are particularly hard on beneficial arthropods which can lead to a resurgence in spider mite populations and subsequent damage which could require control measures. Unfortunately, there are no miticides labeled for use on noncommercial plums.

Responder: Bob Bellinger
State: SC
Date Requested: Oct 30, 2007
Response: Comment 1: Bob, From the vegetable standpoint, i.e. cowpea and green peanut, malathion is not listed in our Guidelines for Vegetable Production in the SE US for any pests on cowpea or peanut. We have more effective and safer non-OP materials available and recommended for aphid control. Also, malathion is less effective on the other pests of these crops than the materials recommended in the guide. Small or limited-resource growers use this material due to ignorance about more modern materials, cost, and availability in small packages. Otherwise, commercial use if very limited. Powell [Smith] Comment 2: from a commercial grower standpoint neither peanut nor sunflower has any malathion usage. Jay [Chapin] Comment 3: Bob, With the commodities listed, this will have little impact on commercial fruit production. I'm unsure if loss of malathion on commercial plums would impact home garden plum growers? As always, thanks for being sure I don't overlook such items. Regards, Dan [Horton]

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: FL
Date Requested: Nov 01, 2007
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response:

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: PR
Date Requested: Nov 01, 2007
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response:

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: VI
Date Requested: Nov 01, 2007
Not Important/Relevant to my state(s)
Response:

Responder: Rick Brandenburg
State: NC
Date Requested: Nov 05, 2007
Response: No uses of malathion on peanuts worth keeping. Rick Brandenburg Department of Entomology North Carolina State University

Responder: Holly Gatton
State: VA
Date Requested: Nov 15, 2007
Response: Responses from Specialists:

Holly; I would like to see the use maintained on cowpea. It is not a major use, but it is always good to maintain rotational products. I would like to see malathion maintained as a aphid material for cowpeas.
-Dr. Allen Straw
Vegetable Specialist
astraw@vt.edu

Malathion is not used in peanuts in VA...too any detectable level. Not important.
-Ames Herbert
Extension Entomologist/State IPM Coordinator
herbert@vt.edu

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