Information Requests Monitoring System

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Request ID: 81
Request From: Steve Toth
Date Requested: Jun 18, 2004
Request: The following is a request from Kent Smith, USDA Office of Pest Management Policy, regarding the fungicide FERBAM: Ferbam is just beginning a regulatory review. The registrant, Taminco, has indicated that they will not support several uses that are currently registered. I have attached a detailed summary of the uses and rates that will be supported and the specific uses being lost. However, in summary, here are the basic uses affected. Supported Uses are: cranberries, citrus, mangos (24c), nectarines, and peaches. Unsupported Uses are: apples, caneberries (24c), cherries, grapes, forestry uses (plant beds and conifers), ornamentals, pears, and tobacco. Several of these unsupported uses are hardly used which is undoubtedly why Taminco is unwilling to pay for the residue trials that will support continued use. According to usage data obtained by EPA, current usage on most crops is minimal as indicated in the second attachment. If any of these disappearing uses are important to you, please contact me. We may be able to save needed uses. If possible, tell me: 1) the crop and disease affected, and 2) the state or region affected, and 3) the use pattern needed: rate, number of applications, application method, and timing, and 4) alternative disease management tools, and 5) why ferbam is needed (only efficacious control, effective IPM material, broad spectrum control, etc.). Thanks for your help. If you want to comment on any of the affected uses, please respond by July 6. I will be contacting certain commodity groups directly. If you receive any duplicates of this request, please ignore them. Kent *********************************************** Kent L. Smith, Ph.D. Plant Pathologist Office of Pest Management Policy (OPMP) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 1400 Independence Ave, SW Room 3859, South Ag Building Washington, DC 20250-0315 202-720-3186 (voice) 202-720-3191 (fax) ksmith@ars.usda.gov www.ars.usda.gov/opmp/

Responses
Responder: Ples Spradley
State: AR
Date Requested:
Response: Very little ferbam is used by Arkansas growers. They primarily use the newer-chemistry fungicides. It may be occasionally used by homeowners.

Responder: Tom Melton
State: NC
Date Requested:
Response: Ferbam is only labeled for outdoor plantbeds in North Carolina, of which there are some, but I have not seen one in 5 years. Our only need would be if mancozeb was removed, we might would try to get Ferbam in greenhouses as it is in Kentucky. Tom Thomas A. Melton, Ph.D., CPAg Research Triangle Institute Agricultural Disaster Research Institute (919) 541-6513 (919) 316-3895 Plant Pathologist (Tobacco) North Carolina State University

Responder: David Ritchie
State: NC
Date Requested:
Response: Ferbam has one use on peaches in North Carolina and that is for leaf curl, however, there are good alternatives. Plus I doubt that much ferbam is currently used on peaches anyway. Dave Ritchie Plant Pathology North Carolina State University

Responder: Mark Mossler
State: FL
Date Requested:
Response: After talking to state and university pathologists, the unsupported uses of ferbam pose no particular loss to Florida, or apparently to Mississippi or Louisiana, as they have no SLN's with this a.i. The only concern was for future availability of other thiocarbamates, such as maneb or mancozeb. Sincerely, Mark Mossler UF/IFAS FL IPMC 352 392-4721

Responder: Turner Sutton
State: NC
Date Requested:
Response: There is very little if any ferbam used on apples in North Carolina. Turner Sutton Plant Pathology North Carolina State University

Responder: Phillip Brannen
State:
Date Requested:
Response: I appreciate the fact that Ferbam will still be available for peach. We definitely need this material for this commodity. In addition, I am concerned about the loss of Ferbam for apple and pear. I will reply relative to the issues discussed. 1) Apple (cedar apple rust and summer rots) 2) Georgia 3) prebloom through cover sprays: 3-8 lbs, 6-8 applications, applied by airblast 4) alternative fungicides exist, but many of these are subject to resistance (i.e. strobilurins) 5) Ferbam is needed as a good IPM material. It has broad spectrum activity, and it is not likely to develop resistance. 1) Pear(sooty blotch, fabraea leaf spot, and fruit spot) 2) Georgia 3) prebloom through cover sprays: 4-6 lbs, 6-8 applications, applied by airblast 4) alternative fungicides exist, but many of these are subject to resistance (i.e. strobilurins). Ferbam is effective for leaf spots in pears. 5) Ferbam is needed as a good IPM material. It has broad spectrum activity, and it is not likely to develop resistance. Phillip M. Brannen Extension Plant Pathologist - Fruits 2106 Miller Plant Sciences Bldg. Athens, GA 30602 Phone (706) 542-1250 Fax (706) 542-4102 E-mail PBRANNEN@ARCHES.UGA.EDU

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